Friday, March 20, 2020

What Has Prepared You For a Time Such As This?

Barbara of Small Moments left a comment on yesterday's post that I found very thought provoking.

Barbara wrote:  
 I wonder if we ladies of a 'certain age' are finding it easier than younger people to manage food in these awful times, simply because many of us have lived through periods of post war rationing where everything had to be made to go another day?

I remember being whisked away in the dead of night to a New Mexican underground bomb shelter during the Cuban Missile Crisis. That was in October of 1962 and I was almost 3 years old.  We were there for a few days and nights.  The only toy I had was my plastic Lucy doll.  I don't remember what we ate but I do know we would not have complained.

 My mother grew up during the depression.  She remembers vagabonds coming to the back door begging for food.  Though they had very little,  my grandmother always had something to share with them.

Because of my mother's background, I grew up in a very frugal environment.  My mother always had a pantry stocked with rice, beans, and canned food.  Our meal portions were just enough.  My mother would make desserts from time to time and we were happy with whatever it was.  One cookie or one small sliver of pie or a thin strip of cantaloupe ~ my mother stretched the treats as far as she could.  My three siblings and I didn't realize that we didn't have much.  My parents did not believe in borrowing money or paying with credit.  They only purchased what they had money for.

I raised my family the very same way.  I bought what I could afford.  I stocked up on food & household items when I could.  We lived frugally and were able to pay off our first house in less than 9 years.  All our 4 children had braces.  All 4 of the children went to college.  All done with only one wage earner in the house.

I don't mean to toot my own horn.  I just want to give you a little background on how I grew up.

Does our generation have the advantage in dealing with being quarantined and working with the scarcity of food available?

Yes, I do.

What do you think?  What has prepared you for a time such as this?

Sharing with Beverly

20 comments:

  1. My Mother was also great at being sure there was always a meal on the table. Sometimes it was fried bologna and a vegetable, but we didn't go hungry. She taught me to survive as best as I could...sometimes we hit a spot of no frills and no extras. That's okay, because life is not about the frills and extras, it's about loving one another and living for Christ. Enjoyed visiting with you today.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Amen, Mary! I've never had fried bologna but I bet it tastes good!

      Delete
  2. What a beautiful blog you have! I enjoyed reading of the frugal and yet abundance of your childhood. There are wonderful lessons in there for all of us.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I'll be seventy in July and though we always had enough we still lived frugally. My mother cooked and baked "from scratch" and always had the pantry and freezer full without wasting anything. I used to joke that she could feed all of our town with her freezer. My food stock is things that will last. Lots of dried beans, rice, lentils and root vegetables. Still able to get fresh foods, but I'm stocked up. My motto has been what would my great grandmother have done? She had 11 children and lived in Ukraine. They didn't see much green from fall to spring, but figured out how to preserve and get by. My grandmother was a great pickle maker and her green tomatoes were the best.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome, Buttercup! My mother cooked and baked from scratch too. I remember her grinding meat. So much wisdom from our older loved ones. ♥

      Delete
  4. I agree with you! I grew up much the same way as you! I remember getting an orange in my Christmas stocking and thinking I had the world! My first house was furnished in hand-me-downs with covers. Kids today think they need the best of the best. So yes, I think it isn't that hard for us to get through these times. And we all will!! Thanks for your visit today!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Terri, I would get an orange in my stocking too! We didn't have them often. Maybe they were expensive? We definitely had hand-me-down furniture for many years. Life was still good! :-)

      Delete
  5. Thank you for visiting my blog and commenting. I hope we can become friends here. I read in James where we learn patience through tribulation and we sure are learning right now arent we? Linda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Linda! Thank you for visiting too. Yes, let's be friends! I've been praying to become closer to God and I think He heard my prayers! ♥

      Delete
  6. Growing up with a mindset of not living beyond your means and living frugally. We weren't given things growing up; if you wanted something, you saved for it. I hope you have a peaceful weekend, Gina!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely, Robin! It's disheartening seeing so many (not all) of the young people being careless and self-centered. Have a lovely weekend!

      Delete
  7. Gina, I do think we are more prepared as like you and your husband, we lived on a tight budget at a young family. I can remember making Tuna burgers. lol I purchased some canned salmon for my pantry and there was a lot on the shelf. I guess young people have never heard of salmon patties. When I was a little girl we had an outhouse until I was in first grade and we did not know what toilet paper was!! We did get toilet paper when we got our shiny new bathroom that was bulit on what was prevously a back porch.lol How times have changed.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Arlene, wow an outhouse! I'm glad you lived in the South and not freezing in the wintertime North. I bet tuna burgers are good. I have a few cans in the cupboard!

      Delete
  8. I think that we are also lucky enough to have homes that can store extra items too. My daughter lives in a bigger city and she has very limited amount of room in her apartment to store extra's so that makes it harder to be prepared when times like this come, but thankfully she likes to cook and so does her hubby, so they can stretch meals when they get them. I grew up with 5 siblings so we had to make meals last on one income also, but when I was young I always had faith in my Dad to provide even when he was laid off. Now I am old enough to have faith that God will provide.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your childhood sounds wonderful, Connie! I think it helps tremendously to know how to cook especially with stretching meals.

      Delete
  9. This was a most encouraging post, Gina, as were all the comments! My mother often relates of her childhood memories of going through the depression, she was always and is still so frugal, and taught us her skills as well, to which I am so thankful.
    Blessings,
    Sue

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am so thankful too, Sue! Having less really is more! xo

      Delete
  10. Happy Pink Saturday, Gina. I am so happy that you joined us. Please come back every week.

    I was so moved by your post. I lived in Florida during the Cuban missile crisis. We had to wear dog tags to school.♥

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Beverly!! I will do my best! ♥

      Goodness, dog tags! Those were scary times.

      Delete

Thank you so much for visiting and commenting! I look forward to getting to know you better.

But oh! the blessing it is to have a friend to whom one can speak fearlessly on any subject; with whom one's deepest as well as one's most foolish thoughts come out simply and safely. Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away. ~Dinah Maria Craik, A Life for a Life, "Chapter XVI: Her Story," 1859