Tuesday, April 7, 2020

The Gentle Art of Cloistered Cooking

The ordinary acts we practice every day at home are of more importance to the soul than their simplicity might suggest. ~Thomas Moore



cloister:
-a place of religious seclusion, as a monastery or -convent.
-any quiet, secluded place.

In this time of seclusion, I have discovered the gentle art of cloistered cooking. The very act of preparing a meal is a prayer of thanksgiving and praise.  Peeling potatoes, cutting up vegetables, and turning it all into a supper of substance is a beautifully meaningful act. Because of the times we live in,  this very ordinary act doesn't seems very ordinary at all.

I often listen to praise music as I work.  My hands may be mashing potatoes or stirring a pot of chili but my spirit is singing.  I am not alone.  I feel God's presence in these every day moments.

In times like these, cloistered cooking becomes a gentle art, a gift, an offering, and a praise.

16 comments:

  1. Hi Gina~

    I love this post...so applicable in this troubled time. I am so grateful that I have all I need, right in my home, such a blessing.

    Loved the song from your last post! Any and all uplifting music is so appreciated right now, don't we all need hope, peace and comfort in our homes right now. It was just beautiful!

    Lilah Rose...oh my heart, she is just as cute now as she was as a puppy! I'm so glad she is with you, the two of you have had a few adventures. She looks like she's very much at home. She has some good DNA, I love all of those breeds!!

    Stay safe and well! XOXO

    Hugs and Love,
    Barb

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    1. I am so glad, Barb! Each day is a gift!

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  2. What a beautiful way to think as you prepare your meals. Praise God! Thanks for sharing this!

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  3. Another reminder for us to slow down in this time, and ty to make the most of each moment. Is this bread basket baked by you? It looks delicious!

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    1. Ginny, I didn't bake the bread. I wish I had! :-)

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  4. "Cloistered Cooking" -- what a lovely way to phrase it, Gina! You have turned my time in the kitchen into a holy place.

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    1. Barbara, you are so sweet. I know I so easily forget that each and every moment is something precious. ♥

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  5. Gina, thank you for sharing! What a beautiful way to think about cooking or even benefitting from the cook!

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    1. You are so very welcome, Robin! I admit that I too often don't "treasure" the tasks that I do. I'm trying.

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  6. Such a lovely thought Gina! We can find joy in the simplest of things that we do!

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  7. Wow now that is a good way of looking at it, I have never cared for cooking or baking. I did it because that was expected of me but not that I enjoyed it but looking at it as a prayer of thanksgiving and praise for the bounty we have been blessed with.

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    1. Connie, I haven't always felt this way. I think seeing (or rather not seeing) what we have available to cook/bake with really has opened my eyes. xo

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But oh! the blessing it is to have a friend to whom one can speak fearlessly on any subject; with whom one's deepest as well as one's most foolish thoughts come out simply and safely. Oh, the comfort — the inexpressible comfort of feeling safe with a person — having neither to weigh thoughts nor measure words, but pouring them all right out, just as they are, chaff and grain together; certain that a faithful hand will take and sift them, keep what is worth keeping, and then with the breath of kindness blow the rest away. ~Dinah Maria Craik, A Life for a Life, "Chapter XVI: Her Story," 1859